header routines
header routines

This may be work in the Practical Life or the Sensorial area, art or reading and math work; depending on the level of development and the interest of the child at that time.

Given that repetition is in the nature of two and a half – six year olds, children will often become fascinated with a particular activity. It is sometimes difficult for adults to comprehend the reasons why children repeat an activity over and over again, until they are satisfied that they have mastered it. Maria Montessori made special note of the importance of this, in her lengthy observations of children. Modern research now supports her theory that repetition is a vital part of brain development, which also has implications for concentration. Given the space to work through their interest, children will usually be able to balance their work when it is viewed over a period of time, rather than in the course of one week.

When children feel like a snack, they help themselves. They have the option to make toast, or to spread margarine, vegemite etc. on crackers. The children have egg, carrots, and a variety of fruits and vegetables in this area, which they may like to try. There is always water available to drink. Daily snacks form part of the Practical Life area and should not be ‘viewed’ as a formal meal. Children may or may not choose to partake. Every day, two children are able to make scones, which are baked for the group to share. As the children grow, they become more independent, requiring little or no adult input. Group music and movement is offered later in the session.

The full day programme gives children – as they get older – the opportunity to be involved in more in-depth study, projects, and the ability to consolidate and complete the work begun in the morning. The full day programme also gives continuity to the younger children, who may otherwise have to go on to other types of childcare during the day. They acquire the same benefits enjoyed by their older classmates.